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    Ready for Another Night

    University Photographer, Mark Philbrick, captured this sunset image of the BYU West Mountain Observatory in early June 2016. At the same time, Physics and Astronomy students were at work preparing the telescopes for yet another night of research observations. Data are secured on these nights for a wide variety of projects ranging from careful searches for exoplanets to monitoring active galaxies. The resulting data support research efforts of BYU students and faculty and in many cases contribute to larger international collaborations.

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    Radiation from Wavepackets

    When an electron is born through ionization in a strong laser field, the wavepacket can be very large. As this large wavepacket continues to experience the laser field, different parts of the packet are accelerated in different directions. How will such a system radiate light? Contradicting predictions have been published in the literature, and Professors Justin Peatross and Michael Ware are looking to solve the issue with theory and experiment.

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    Predictions on candidate superalloys

    Superalloys are high-performance materials that are essential to key transportation and power generation technologies. By using BYU's supercomputer as a virtual lab, together with state-of-the-art algorithms for modeling materials, the Materials Simulation Group (msg.byu.edu) has identified 75 new superalloy candidates for which there are no reported phase diagrams. The new candidates may be the key to enhanced performance in transportation and power generation components. The figure shows the computed formation enthalpy over more than 700 Ni-based systems that were explored as part of this large survey. Roughly speaking, the darker the circle, the more promising the system. The x-y coordinates in the grid denote the two minority elements that are combined with nickel.

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    Predicting new superalloys

    Superalloys are high-performance materials that are essential to key transportation and power generation technologies. By using BYU's supercomputer as a virtual lab, together with state-of-the-art algorithms for modeling materials, the Materials Simulation Group (msg.byu.edu) has identified 75 new superalloy candidates for which there are no reported phase diagrams. The new candidates may be the key to enhanced performance in transportation and power generation components. The figure shows the formation enthalpy and relative stability (to other phases) of more than 2000 Ni/Co/Fe-based systems. The Co- and Fe-based systems have been offset to the right for clarity. Any system landing in the dashed boxes is more promising than the new Co-Al-W system that was discovered in 2006 (Sato et al, Science).

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    Physics graduate earns a Grammy

    BYU’s very first physics graduate, known to many as the “Father of Stereophonic Sound,” is being recognized by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences at this year’s Grammy Awards. The Recording Academy selected Dr. Harvey Fletcher to win a posthumous Technical Grammy Award for his work with Leopold Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra, producing more than a hundred of the world’s first stereophonic recordings.

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27 September, Tuesday

Sunset
7:16 PM

28 September, Wednesday

Sunrise
7:20 AM
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Recently Published Research

Stacey Smith, Baiyu Huang, Calvin Bartholomew, Branton Campbell, Juliana Boerio-Goates, and Brian Woodfield recently published an article titled "La-Dopant Location in La-Doped γ-Al2O3 Nanoparticles Synthesized Using a Novel One-Pot Process" in Journal of Physical Chemistry C. Click on the image above to read it.

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Jupiters Europa from Spacecraft Galileo : What mysteries might be solved by peering into this crystal ball? In this case, the ball is actually a moon of Jupiter, the crystals are ice, and the moon is not only dirty but cracked beyond repair....

This photograph and Description come from NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day web site.

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