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    Slab-Stacking in Gd5(Si,Bi)4

    Structures based on stacking sequences of Gd5T4 slabs are determined by the directionality of interslab T-T dimers. These include giant-magnetocaloric compounds like Gd5Si2Ge2. In the T = (Si,Bi) system, substituting Si for Bi not only leads to the complete electronic/geometric cleavage of the interslab dimers, it removes the directionality of residual nearest-slab interactions, which facilitates novel stacking sequences and extensive stacking faults.

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    Scattering Probes of Material Structure

    BYU physics researchers use some of the world's brightest x-ray and neutron sources to study the atomic structure and dynamics of advanced materials like superconductors and piezoelectrics. At the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, accelerator-driven proton pulses bombard a liquid-mercury target, knocking high-energy neutrons from the target nuclei, which are then slowed in a moderator, collimated into beams, and scattered from material samples.

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    Scattering Probes of Material Structure

    BYU physics researchers use some of the world's brightest x-ray and neutron sources to study the atomic structure and dynamics of advanced materials like superconductors and piezoelectrics. At the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, electrons travel around a one-kilometer synchrotron ring at nearly the speed of light, emitting high-energy tangential Bremsstrahlung x-rays that are collimated into beams and scattered from material samples.

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    Ready for Another Night

    University Photographer, Mark Philbrick, captured this sunset image of the BYU West Mountain Observatory in early June 2016. At the same time, Physics and Astronomy students were at work preparing the telescopes for yet another night of research observations. Data are secured on these nights for a wide variety of projects ranging from careful searches for exoplanets to monitoring active galaxies. The resulting data support research efforts of BYU students and faculty and in many cases contribute to larger international collaborations.

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    Radiation from Wavepackets

    When an electron is born through ionization in a strong laser field, the wavepacket can be very large. As this large wavepacket continues to experience the laser field, different parts of the packet are accelerated in different directions. How will such a system radiate light? Contradicting predictions have been published in the literature, and Professors Justin Peatross and Michael Ware are looking to solve the issue with theory and experiment.

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30 September, Friday

Sunset
7:11 PM

1 October, Saturday

Sunrise
7:23 AM
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Recently Published Research

Taylor Richards, Justin Peatross, Michael Ware, and Lawrence Rees recently published an article titled "Electron transit time measurements of 5-in photomultiplier tubes" in Nuclear Instruments & Methods In Physics Research Section A-Accelerators Spectrometers Detectors And Associated Equipment. Click on the image above to read it.

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Lynds Dark Nebula 1251: Stars are forming in Lynds Dark Nebula (LDN) 1251. About 1,000 light-years away, the dusty molecular cloud is part of a complex of dark nebulae mapped toward the Cepheus flare region, drifting above the plane of our Milky Way galaxy....

This photograph and Description come from NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day web site.

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