×
Department Library

2004

Jenni Currit (Capstone, December 2004, Advisor: Steven Jones, Warner Woodworth )

Abstract

The developing world suffers from a variety of problems including lack of food, fuel shortage, environmental abuses, and unemployment. Many non-profit organizations work to alleviate these problems, but often find that a coordination between scientists and developers is difficult yet necessary to make effective improvements. This project is an attempt to bridge the gap between technological development and international development. Dr. Steven Jones of Brigham Young University, has been developing solar oven technology for several years. I joined the project after much progress had been made. My project had two phases. The first phase was spent developing solar oven designs that would be both effective and practical in developing countries where money and materials are hard to obtain. The second phase was an effort to take the technology to non-governmental organizations currently doing work in developing countries in an educational approach that would allow them to have a flexible approach to implementing valuable technology for those with the most urgent need. This paper includes the findings and accomplishments of both phases. The educational materials distributed to the organizations are also included as well as a list of groups who have received this information in hopes that future interest will rise and the materials will be made available to an even wider audience.

John Rajikannu (Capstone, January 2004, Advisor: Steven Jones )

Abstract

The purpose of this capstone project was to integrate the elements of my Computer Science Emphasis together with Physics. After some research and inquiries, it was initially proposed that the project would be a continuation of technical support for Dr Steven Jones Solar Powered Cookers. Originally, the idea was to setup the temperature logging features of the HP TI 83. However, upon further contemplation, I proposed that we should pursue the integration of the commonly popular Palm device to facilitate our temperature logging methods. Within a week of searching, we were able to source and acquire a simple device that enabled a Palm Pilot to record and log temperature data.

2003

Jacob Anderson (Senior Thesis, March 2003, Advisor: Steven Jones )

Abstract

Mark Scott (Senior Thesis, August 2003, Advisor: Steven Jones )

Abstract

1998

Margaret J Lawler (PhD Dissertation, April 1998, Advisor: Steven Jones )

Abstract

Recent models for light production in single bubble sonoluminescence predict maximum temperatures of 108K. These models are also believed to be valid during extremely spherical cavitation events occurring during transient sonoluminescence. In this work first the issue of whether light production in agitated mercury is sonoluminescent in origin or due to an unrelated electrostatic phenomenon is examined. Next address the issue of whether the extremely high temperatures predicted by current models are actually achieved is addressed. At temperatures this high significant levels of fusion take place. Neutron production rates for both single bubble sonoluminescence in heavy water and transient sonoluminescence of deuterium bubbles in liquid metals are examined. While there is no evidence of fusion, with this information an upper bound on the temperatures achieved is calculated.

1997

Derek Hullinger (Senior Thesis, September 1997, Advisor: Steven Jones )

Abstract

Scott L. Vance (Honors Thesis, February 1997, Advisor: Steven Jones )

Abstract

1996

Samuel T. Jones (Honors Thesis, March 1996, Advisor: Steven Jones )

Abstract

1995

Taylor Y. Cardall (Honors Thesis, July 1995, Advisor: Steven Jones )

Abstract

1994

Stuart Fisher Taylor (PhD Dissertation, December 1994, Advisor: Steven Jones )

Abstract

Studies seeking an upper limit on two types of low temperature nuclear fusion are presented. The limiting factor for muon catalyzed fusion is primarily the probability that the muon remains bound to the alpha produced by the fusion, known as the “sticking fraction”. Experiments determining the sticking using high tritium fractions or by direct measurements are presented. In deuterium/condensed matter systems the question has reduced to whether nuclear fusion proceeds at all. Experimental searches for neutrons and tritium in such systems are described.

1988

Ping Li (Masters Thesis, April 1988, Advisor: Steven Jones )

Abstract

The first direct measurement of alpha-muon sticking in muon-catalyzed fusion is described. An original Monte Carlo program was revised to simulate the experiment and to predict arrival time verses energy distribution for detected alpha and alpha-muon ions. Then the data from the real experiment was analyzed. Finally, the alpha - muon sticking ws was calculated from the ratio of the number of alpha-muon+ to the number of alpha++.