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    174th Acoustical Society of America

    Seven students, one postdoc, and four faculty attended the 174th Meeting of the ASA in New Orleans, LA from Dec. 4-8, 2017, including chairing 4 sessions and presenting 12 talks.

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    West Mountain, Moon, Venus, and Stars

    This image was secured just after the end of evening twilight on a clear April night from the West Mountain Observatory. The view is looking west past the domes housing the two smaller research telescopes at the observatory. The thin crescent Moon is also illuminated by reflected light from the Earth that is known as earthshine. Higher in the sky, the bright 'star' is actually the planet Venus. In between the two, the 'V' shaped group of stars in the constellation of Taurus is in reality the nearby open cluster known as the Hyades. Photo credit: Dr. Michael D. Joner

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    Total Solar Eclipse: August 21, 2017

    This is a photo secured by Dr. Michael Joner in Riverton, Wyoming of the great eclipse of 2017. The image shows the inner corona along with several solar prominences seen near mid-totality. This is the first solar eclipse visible from the continental United States in 38 years. America's next opportunity will be on April 8, 2024 for viewers between Texas and Maine.

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    The Tulip in the Swan

    This image from the BYU 0.9-m telescope looks out along the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy toward the constellation Cygnus the Swan. Called the Tulip Nebula, the glowing cloud of interstellar gas and dust is also listed in the 1959 catalog by astronomer Stewart Sharpless as Sh2-101. This nebula is about 8,000 light-years away from the solar system. The nebula shown here is a composite image that maps emission from sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms into red, green, and blue colors. Energy from the hot O-type star HDE 227018 ionizes atoms in this region so that we see a faint glow from the Tulip Nebula. HDE 227018 is seen near the blue arc at center of the image. This appeared as the NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day on July 26, 2012. Image Credit & Copyright: Michael Joner, David Laney (West Mountain Observatory, BYU); Processing - Robert Gendler

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    The BYU 0.9-meter Reflector

    This photograph from university photographer, Mark Philbrick shows the BYU 0.9-meter Reflector at the West Mountain Observatory focused on a field near the galactic center during the summer of 2016. The stars of the constellation Scorpius are visible through the lower center portion of the dome slit with the planets Mars (on the right side) and Saturn (just off the left edge) visible. The computer controlled telescope was funded through an NSF grant; AST 0618209.

Calendar

17 Oct, Today

Sunset
6:45 PM

18 Oct, Thursday

Sunrise
7:40 AM

22 Oct, Monday

Colloquium: Z. Johnson
4:00 PM

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Recently Published Research

Kent Gee and Alan Wall et al. recently published an article titled "Summary of “Supersonic Jet and Rocket Noise”" in Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics. Click on the image above to read it.

Astronomy Picture of the Day

M15: Dense Globular Star Cluster: Messier 15 is an immense swarm of over 100,000 stars. A 13 billion year old relic of the early formative years of our galaxy it's one of about 170 globular star clusters that still roam the halo of the Milky Way....

This photograph and Description come from NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day web site.

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